Tag Archives: deptnews

Invitation to the 2015 AMOS Project Demo Day

On July 15th, from 10:15 to 11:45 Uhr, this year’s AMOS Projects will be demoing their project results to the public. The location is Room 00.136, which is a room on the ground floor of the Mensa building (located in the back behind the Cafeteria). Please register using this form so that we can plan appropriately.

Schedule

Time Content
10:15-10:20 Welcome by Prof. Riehle
10:20-10:30 By project, thank you to students and industry partners
10:30-11:45 Demos and posters, fair-style (wie eine Messe)

All projects welcome you at their booth for demos and questions and answers.

Continue reading Invitation to the 2015 AMOS Project Demo Day

Upcoming Research Talk on a Tale of Two Wikipedia Data Projects: Link Enrichment, Document Classification by Robert Biuk-Aghai of University of Macau

The computer science department by way of our research group is hosting a colloquium talk (free and open to the public):

  • by: Dr. Robert Biuk-Aghai, Professor of Computing Sciences at University of Macau
  • about: A Tale of Two Wikipedia Data Projects: Link Enrichment, Document Classification
  • on: July 13th, 2015, 4:15pm
  • at: Cauerstr. 11, 91058 Erlangen, Room 01.150-128

Abstract: Wikipedia has grown to be a vast information resource that is not only useful for its readers, but can also be used as a source of data to power analytical applications. In this talk we present two of our recent projects that have done just that. The first project is aimed at improving Wikipedia inter-language links, by analysing the link structure that connects related content across different languages of Wikipedia and generating new links. The second project has devised a method that uses the Wikipedia category information to derive sets of keywords which are used to assist in classifying a collection of documents.

Continue reading Upcoming Research Talk on a Tale of Two Wikipedia Data Projects: Link Enrichment, Document Classification by Robert Biuk-Aghai of University of Macau

Upcoming Research Talk on Empirical Findings on Effective Documentation of Object Oriented Frameworks by Ian Chai of MMU

The computer science department by way of our research group is hosting a colloquium talk (free and open to the public):

  • by: Dr. Ian Chai, Principal Lecturer at the Faculty of Computing & Informatics Multimedia University, Malaysia
  • about: Empirical Findings on Effective Documentation of Object Oriented Frameworks
  • on: July 20th, 2015, 4:15 pm
  • at: Cauerstr. 11, 91058 Erlangen, Room 01.150-128

Abstract: Object-Oriented Frameworks provide an excellent way for proven, debugged solutions to be reused for a particular domain. However, programmers new to a framework often face a steep learning curve. Therefore, good documentation is essential for framework reuse. We conducted a series of experiments in which we gave different documentation styles for the same problem to different groups of learners. Documentation styles studied include Step-by-step Documentation, Patterns, Minimalist Documentation, and JDoc. These experiments suggest some guidelines for how to document frameworks for new users.

Continue reading Upcoming Research Talk on Empirical Findings on Effective Documentation of Object Oriented Frameworks by Ian Chai of MMU

Interview mit Prof. Riehle zu Open-Source-Geschäftsmodellen sowie Startupinformatik

Passend zur ersten Ausgabe mit unseren neuen Präsidenten, Prof. Joachim Hornegger, haben dann auch wir es in das Magazin der FAU geschafft (lokale Kopie). Wir sind sogar auf der Titelseite unten links gelandet! Konkret handelt es sich um ein Interview mit Prof. Riehle zum Thema Open-Source-Geschäftsmodelle. Ebenfalls kurz angeschnitten werden unsere Startupinformatik-Bemühungen, unternehmerisch gesinnte Studierendenteams zu Startups zu begleiten.

Upcoming Research Talk: When to say NO for Privacy Protection while answering Queries by Johann-Christoph Freytag

The computer science department by way of our research group is hosting a colloquium talk (free and open to the public)

  • by: Prof. Johann-Christoph Freytag, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany
  • about: When to say NO for Privacy Protection while answering Queries
  • on: April 13th, 2015, 16:15 Uhr
  • at: Cauerstr. 11, 91058 Erlangen, Room 01.150-128

Abstract: This talk presents privacy concepts that keep the balance between utility and privacy when returning answers to a sequence of queries. In particular we show how to model the (increasing) knowledge of an adversary resulting from the answers to queries by a sequence of bipartite graphs. Those graphs provide the foundation for algorithms that decide when a privacy breach occurs (might occur) and how to balance the need for accurate responses versus the right for privacy. Examples demonstrate the intricacies of managing this trade-off.

Continue reading Upcoming Research Talk: When to say NO for Privacy Protection while answering Queries by Johann-Christoph Freytag

Research Paper: From Developer Networks to Verified Communities: A Fine-Grained Approach

Abstract: Effective software engineering demands a coordinated effort. Unfortunately, a comprehensive view on developer coordination is rarely available to support software-engineering decisions, despite the significant implications on software quality, software architecture, and developer productivity. We present a fine-grained, verifiable, and fully automated approach to capture a view on developer coordination, based on commit information and source-code structure, mined from version-control systems. We apply methodology from network analysis and machine learning to identify developer communities automatically. Compared to previous work, our approach is fine-grained, and identifies statistically significant communities using order-statistics and a community-verification technique based on graph conductance. To demonstrate the scalability and generality of our approach, we analyze ten open-source projects with complex and active histories, written in various programming languages. By surveying 53 open-source developers from the ten projects, we validate the authenticity of inferred community structure with respect to reality. Our results indicate that developers of open-source projects form statistically significant community structures and this particular view on collaboration largely coincides with developers’ perceptions of real-world collaboration.

Keywords: Open source, social network analysis, developer networks, developer communities, respository mining, conductance

Reference: Mitchell Joblin, Wolfgang Mauerer, Sven Apel, Janet Siegmund, Dirk Riehle. “From Developer Networks to Verified Communities: A Fine-Grained Approach.” In Proceedings of the 37th International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2015). IEEE Press, to appear.

The paper is available as a PDF file.

Research Paper: How Developers Acquire FLOSS Skills

Abstract: With the increasing prominence of open collaboration as found in free/libre/open source software projects and other joint production communities, potential participants need to acquire skills. How these skills are learned has received little research attention. This article presents a large-scale survey (5,309 valid responses) in which users and developers of the beta release of a popular file download application were asked which learning styles were used to acquire technical and social skills. We find that the extent to which a person acquired the relevant skills through informal methods tends to be higher for free/libre/open source code contributors, while being a professional software developer does not have this effect. Additionally, younger participants proved more likely to make use of formal methods of learning. These insights will help individuals, commercial companies, educational institutions, governments and open collaborative projects decide how they promote learning.

Keywords: Competencies, informal learning, non-formal learning, open source, skills, software developer

Reference: Ann Barcomb, Michael Grottke, Jan-Philipp Stauffert, Dirk Riehle, Sabrina Jahn. “How Developers Acquire FLOSS Skills.” In Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Open Source Systems (OSS 2015). Springer Verlag, to appear.

The paper is available as a PDF file.

Research Paper: Improving Traceability of Requirements through Qualitative Data Analysis

Abstract: Traceability is an important quality aspect in modern software development. It facilitates the documentation of decisions and helps identifying conflicts regarding the conformity of one artifact to another. We propose a new approach to requirements engineering that utilizes qualitative research methods, which have been well established in the domain of social science. Our approach integrates traceability between the original documentation and the requirements specification and the domain model and glossary and supports adaptability to change.

Keywords: Requirements analysis, requirements traceability, qualitative data analysis

Reference: Andreas Kaufmann, Dirk Riehle. “Improving Traceability of Requirements through Qualitative Data Analysis.” In Proceedings of the 2015 Software Engineering Konferenz (SE 2015). Springer Verlag, to appear.

The paper is available as a PDF file.

BayFOR and FAU Support for Malaysia Collaboration

Our research group is involved with several Asian universities (mostly in Hong Kong and Malaysia). We are glad to report to have received additional funding from BayFOR and FAU of about EUR 10.000 to continue our engagement with Malaysian universities. We intend to use the funds to drive forward our joing work on a large public grant proposal. These are exclusively (but generous) travel and accommodation funds, both for our Malaysian partners and ourselves.

Final Project Presentations in Nailing your Thesis (NYT), our Course on How to Perform Research

Today, students presented the results of the 10 ECTS research project in Nailing your Thesis, our course on how to perform research. Here is the line-up.

  1. Anja Pohan on “The Motivations and Preconditions for Participating in an Open Source Project in an Early Phase”
  2. Michael Dorner on “Validating a Qualitative Model of Inner Source Tool Needs”
  3. Kiran Bonu on “Cohorts Contribution Behavior in Open Source Projects”
  4. Ralf Spengler on “Where is China in Open Source?”
  5. Leonard Hösch on “Using Machine Learning to Find Open Source Software Categories”
  6. Stefan Nottrott on “How to Retain Episodic Volunteers in Open Source?”
  7. Martin Fleckenstein on “Improving Bug Report Quality and Speed Using Automated Usage Reporting”
  8. Sabrina Klett on “Dealing with Information Overload in Information and Communication Technologies”
  9. Christian Siedelmann on “Who Dominates Code Contributions: Frequent or Infrequent Contributors?”
  10. Qufang Fan on “Practices of Commercial Open Source Marketing”

Below, please find some photo impressions.

Continue reading Final Project Presentations in Nailing your Thesis (NYT), our Course on How to Perform Research