All posts by Grace Ting

Upcoming Interview Workshop with Christian Nester

We will host a (technical) interview workshop at FAU:

  • by: Christian Nester
  • about: Technical Interviews at Google
  • on: 2017-02-06, 10:00 Uhr (max. 90min.)
  • at: Martensstr. 3, 02.152-113

Abstract: This is an workshop for practising technical interviews at Google. It gives you an overview of interviews and hiring at Google and offers an opportunity to practise some interview questions and get feedback. The material is from Google, but other software companies use similar interview processes as well. If you are interested in attending the workshop please signup here goo.gl/Ae96w8.

Speaker: Christian leads a Gmail development team in Zurich. In this role, he focuses on server side software as well as client development. Before joining Gmail he worked as a software engineer in the Google Shopping team. Prior to Google, Christian was a software developer at SAP in Germany and Skyva International in the US. Christian has a diploma degree in computer science from the University of Karlsruhe.

Upcoming Industry Talk on Cluster Management at Google by Christian Nester

We will host an industry talk on “Cluster Management at Google” in ADAP, our course on advanced design and programming (free and open to the public):

  • by: Christian Nester
  • about: Cluster Management at Google
  • on: 2017-02-06, 13:00 Uhr
  • at: Cauerstr. 7/9, Room 0.154-115
  • as part of: ADAP

Abstract: This talk gives an overview of the cluster management system used at Google. The cluster management system runs virtually every server side application at Google. This means it runs thousands of different tasks in a large number of data centres across the world. This talk gives an overview of the system, its architecture as how the user sees it. The talk also gives some insights into the challenges of workload distribution and using clusters efficiently.

Speaker: Christian leads a Gmail development team in Zurich. In this role, he focuses on server side software as well as client development. Before joining Gmail he worked as a software engineer in the Google Shopping team. Prior to Google, Christian was a software developer at SAP in Germany and Skyva International in the US. Christian has a diploma degree in computer science from the University of Karlsruhe.

Upcoming Computer Science Colloquium on Views on Internal and External Validity in Software Engineering by Dr.-Ing. Janet Siegmund

The computer science department by way of our research group is hosting a colloquium talk (free and open to the public):

  • by: Dr.-Ing. Janet Siegmund
  • about: Views on Internal and External Validity in Software Engineering
  • on: November 29th, 2016, 15:45 Uhr
  • at: Room 02.152-113 (Vorstandszimmer), Martenstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen

Abstract: Empirical methods have grown common in software engineering, but there is no consensus on how to apply them properly. Is practical relevance key? Do internally valid studies have any value? Should we replicate more to address the tradeoff between internal and external validity? We asked the community how empirical research should take place in software engineering, complemented with a literature review about the status of empirical research in software engineering. We found that the opinions differ considerably, and that there is no consensus in the community when to focus on internal or external validity and how to conduct and review replications.

Speaker: Janet Siegmund works as a Post-doc at the Chair of Software Engineering, University of Passau. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Magdeburg in 2012 and she holds two master’s degrees, one in Computer Science and one in Psychology. In her research, she focuses on the human factor in software engineering, for example, when writing source code. Janet Siegmund is the co-author of more than 30 peer-reviewed journal, conference, and workshop publications. She regularly serves as program-committee member for conferences and workshops. Since 2014, she is in the steering committee of the International Conference on Program Comprehension.

Upcoming Computer Science Colloquium on How does your Software look like? by Prof. Dr. Claus Lewerentz

The computer science department by way of our research group is hosting a colloquium talk (free and open to the public):

  • by: Prof. Dr. Claus Lewerentz
  • about: How does your Software look like?
  • on: October 24th, 2016, 16:15 Uhr
  • at: Room 01.150-128, Cauerstraße 11, 91058 Erlangen

Abstract: Software systems are complex intangible products and therefore hard to grasp and to communicate about. How can large teams of stakeholders in different roles build a common picture of a software under development. In order to understand software systems, their evolution during development processes, and to assess product and process quality appropriate visualizations become more and more crucial. The talk presents the concept of “software cities” as a uniform visualization and coherent communication approach for representing structural as well as process oriented information on software systems. The city metaphor supports orientation and spatial memory and allows for applying a wealth of cartographic representation techniques of multifaceted data. Specific system aspects or analysis scenarios can be illustrated using various thematic maps. Examples are “quality maps” depicting particular component properties or quality indicators, “effort maps” illustrating the contribution of developers, or “building site activity maps” showing development activities over time. Such software maps based were used in several large scale industry projects as part of quality assurance measures. We report about the experiences.

Speaker: Professor Claus Lewerentz holds a chair for Software and Systems Engineering at BTU Cottbus since 1994. He has studied Computer Science and Medicine at TU Munich (1977-1983) and got a PhD in Software Engineering from RWTH Aachen (1988). Further steps in his professional career were the position of a scientific assistant to the board of directors at the German National Research Centre for Mathematics and Computer Science in Sankt Augustin (1988-1991) and head of the software engineering department at the Computer Science Research Institute in Karlsruhe (1991-1994). His research work is concerned with the construction and analysis of large scale software systems and the development of analysis tools with a particular focus on software quality. Most recently he is working on the visualization of large software systems.

Upcoming Computer Science Colloquium on How Companies Participate in Open Source Projects by Prof. Minghui Zhou

The computer science department by way of our research group is hosting a colloquium talk (free and open to the public):

  • by: Prof. Minghui Zhou, Associate Professor at Peking University
  • about: How Companies Participate in Open Source Projects
  • on: October 4th, 2016, 16:15 Uhr
  • at: Room 01.150-128, Cauerstraße 11, 91058 Erlangen

Abstract: Open source projects are often supported by companies. Such involvement affects the robust contributor inflow needed to sustain the project and sometimes prompts key contributors to leave. To capture user innovation and to maintain quality of software and productivity of teams these projects need to attract and retain contributors. We try to understand and quantify how inflow and retention are shaped by policies and actions of companies in three application server projects. We identify three hybrid projects implementing the same JavaEE specification and use published literature, online materials, and interviews to quantify actions and policies companies used to get involved. We collect project repository data, analyze affiliation history of project participants, and use generalized linear models and survival analysis to measure contributor inflow and retention. We found that full control mechanisms and high intensity of commercial involvement were associated with a decrease of external inflow and with improved retention. However, a shared control mechanism was associated with increased external inflow contemporaneously with the increase of commercial involvement. The methods enable us to quantify aspects of the balance between community and private interests in open source software projects and provide clear implications to inform the structure of future open source communities.

Speaker: Prof. Minghui Zhou focuses on using the data recorded in vast open source and commercial software repositories to investigate how people develop software and how they interact with each other to accomplish their tasks. Her research subjects range from the fluency and learning trajectory of developers to the micro-practices of projects, and to the health and sustainability of communities and ecosystems. She published more than 40 referred papers in journals and international conferences including TSE, TOSEM, ICSE and FSE. She received ACM SIGSOFT (FSE 2010) Distinguished paper award. She served as PC in various conferences, such as FSE 2014 Tool Demo Track (PC Co-Chair), MSR 2016 and ICSE 2018. She consults for several companies regarding software metrics and inner source.

Upcoming Research Talk on Controlled Experiments by Dr.-Ing. Janet Siegmund

We will host a research methods talk on “Controlled Experiments” in NYT, our research course:

  • by: Dr.-Ing. Janet Siegmund
  • about: Controlled Experiments
  • on: 2016-11-29, 14:00 Uhr
  • at: Martensstr. 1, e-Studio
  • as part of: NYT

Abstract: In this talk, I will give an introduction on how to conduct controlled experiments. The talk is structured along the stages of empirical studies, including the definition of research questions, the selection of experimental designs, the analysis and interpretion of the data, and the preparation of a report, for example, as part of a thesis or paper. For each stage, I will highlight the challenges and common pitfalls. After the talk, listeners will have a feeling of the delicateness of conducting sound controlled experiments.

Speaker: Janet Siegmund works as a Post-doc at the Chair of Software Engineering, University of Passau. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Magdeburg in 2012 and she holds two master’s degrees, one in Computer Science and one in Psychology. In her research, she focuses on the human factor in software engineering, for example, when writing source code. Janet Siegmund is the co-author of more than 30 peer-reviewed journal, conference, and workshop publications. She regularly serves as program-committee member for conferences and workshops. Since 2014, she is in the steering committee of the International Conference on Program Comprehension.

Upcoming Industry Talk on Experiences in Aligning Agile and Traditional Project Management at Sixt GmbH by Daniel Liebig

We will host an industry talk on “experiences in aligning agile and traditional project management at Sixt GmbH” in AMOS, our agile methods course. This talk is open to the public.

  • by: Daniel Liebig (Senior Manager Agile Development at Sixt GmbH & Co. Autovermietung KG)
  • about: Experiences in aligning agile and traditional project management at Sixt GmbH
  • on: July 6th, 2016, 10:15 Uhr
  • at: H10, Erwin-Rommel-Straße 60
  • as part of: AMOS

Abstract: Traditional and agile project management take different approaches to reach the same goal: Deliver working software, even though it can be a challenge to run both methodologies under the same roof. This talk is about how Sixt experienced, accepted and managed this challenge.

Speaker: Daniel Liebig has been working as Software Engineer, Team Lead and Project Manager since 1999. After working as a freelancer for companies like Audi, Allianz, Triumph, Yahoo and many more he joined Sixt in March 2015 to run a transition to agile software development.

Upcoming Computer Science Colloquium on Requirements Monitoring in Systems of Systems by Paul Grünbacher

The computer science department by way of our research group is hosting a colloquium talk (free and open to the public):

  • by: Paul Grünbacher
  • about: Requirements Monitoring in Systems of Systems
  • on: July 26th, 2016, 16:15 Uhr
  • at: Room 01.150-128, Cauerstraße 11, 91058 Erlangen

Abstract: Many software systems today can be characterized as systems of systems (SoS) comprising interrelated and heterogeneous systems. Due to their scale, complexity, and heterogeneity engineers face significant challenges when determining the compliance of SoS with their requirements. Requirements monitoring approaches are a promising solution for checking system properties at runtime. This talk will describe a requirements monitoring approach for SoS providing the following characteristics: it uses a DSL-based approach for defining and monitoring requirements; it allows modeling the monitoring scopes of requirements with respect to the SoS architecture; it employs event models to abstract from different technologies and systems to be monitored; and it discovers violations of requirements at runtime across different levels and systems. The talk will also report experiences of applying the approach to a real-world SoS of an industrial partner in the domain of industrial automation.

Speaker: Paul Grünbacher is an Associate Professor at the Institute for Software Systems Engineering at Johannes Kepler Universität Linz (Austria). He is the head of the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Monitoring and Evolution of Very-Large-Scale Software Systems, a 7-year research project co-funded by industrial partners. Paul’s research interests include software product lines, model-based development and evolution, requirements engineering, and value-based software engineering. He has published more than 100 papers in international peer-reviewed journals, conferences, and workshops. Paul is an Editorial Board Member of the Elsevier Journal on Information and Software Technology. He is regularly serving as a reviewer for international journals and conferences. He is member of ACM, ACM SIGSOFT, the IEEE CS, the Austrian Computer Society, and Euromicro.

Upcoming Industry Talk on Univention & Business Model by Peter Ganten of Univention (Founder & CEO), Open Source Business Alliance (Chairman)

We will host an industry talk on “Univention & Business Model” in FLOSS, our open source course. The talk is free and open to the public (and will be held online in this case).

  • by: Peter Ganten of Univention (Founder & CEO), Open Source Business
    Alliance (Chairman)
  • about: Univention & Business Model
  • on: June 14th, 2016, 15:30 Uhr
  • at: H2, Egerlandstr. 3
  • as part of: FLOSS

Abstract: Univention provides a Linux based IT infrastructure and management platform for enterprises. I will give an overview about our products, the value we deliver to our customers (and for what they pay), our business model and why we think it is sustainable and defensible.

Speaker: Peter Ganten is CEO of Univention, the company he founded in 2002. Together with the incredible team at Univention Peter has made it possible for thousands of organizations world wide to successfully use Open Source software. Peter is also the chairman of the Open Source Business Alliance, which is the Open Source business association in the German-speaking area.

Upcoming Industry Talk on The Center for the Cultivation of Technology by Moritz Bartl of Renewable Freedom Foundation

We will host an industry talk on “The Center for the Cultivation of Technology” in FLOSS, our open source course. The talk is free and open to the public.

  • by: Moritz Bartl of Renewable Freedom Foundation
  • about: The Center for the Cultivation of Technology
  • on: May 31st, 2016, 15:30 Uhr
  • at: H2, Egerlandstr. 3
  • as part of: FLOSS

Abstract: The Center for the Cultivation of Technology is a new project that grew out of countless discussions in the digital activism and Free Software scene over the past years. In this session, we will talk about sustainability of core infrastructure projects, how to win contributors for projects (and how to become a contributor), project health indicators and the state of open source technology and foundationsthrough the lens of not-for-profit privacy technologies and core libraries such as GnuPG and OpenSSL.

Speaker: Moritz Bartl is the director of a “Digital Human Rights” foundation based in Ingolstadt, supported by the owner of the Donaukurier daily newspaper. The foundation works closely with technology projects, civil liberties groups and digital advocacy organizations to protect and preserve Human Rights in the digital landscape. Moritz is a Free Software enthusiast, a core member of the anonymization project Tor, a fellow of the Hermes Center for Transparency and Human Rights, and has been contributing to various open source projects for almost two decades.